January 2006 - What We Now Know

You won't find specific stock recommendations in "What We Now Know", but you WILL find a remarkable array of fascinating, entertaining, and always useful information on a wide range of trends in the economy, geo-politics, health and technology and more.

  • Reader Feedback 01/31/2006

    After our announcement last week that we would discontinue What We Now Know, our inbox was flooded with hundreds of deeply saddened, disappointed and upset reader emails--some begging us to reconsider our decision, a few dozens offering to pay any reasonable...
  • Most Research Findings Wrong

    An August 2005 article in New Scientist stated that "Most published scientific research papers are wrong, according to a new analysis. Assuming that the new paper is itself correct, problems with experimental and statistical methods mean that there...
  • Thought Control in China

    There have been recent rumblings in the Middle Kingdom, as some people in pursuit of the Chinese dream have expressed doubts and displeasure at the way things are moving. As the British Guardian reported in December 2005, "He Feng, former Communist...
  • Presidential Statements

    One would have to be an ostrich not to realize that the Bush administration has taken a number of steps that would have provoked a constitutional crisis if there were any effective opposition party in Washington. There isn't, of course, and so we...
  • Obituary for a Newsletter

    Dear Subscribers, After more than two years and 114 issues of What We Now Know , it's time to say goodbye. The reason why we are calling it quits is trivial but significant: Money. Call it filthy lucre, but as our investor-readers know, ultimately...
  • Equality of Opportunity

    "The first lesson of economics is scarcity: There is never enough of anything to satisfy all those who want it. The first lesson of politics is to disregard the first lesson of economics." - Thomas Sowell Sowell is, of course, correct. Just...
  • Gamblemania by Doug Casey

    In the 1972 film, The Great Northfield, Minnesota Raid , the famous 19th century bandit Cole Younger, as played by Cliff Robertson, happens upon a game he's never seen before. "It's called baseball," someone tells him, "and it's...
  • What's Next in the Middle East?

    Iran, of course, has never really gone away. Although a year ago, we ran an article on the possibility of the Bush Administration extending its Middle Eastern military adventure in that direction, no attack materialized. This despite Iran's threat...
  • America--the World's Court

    (originally published in WWNK 9/27/04) To illustrate the complexities of personal damages law, legal students are often given a test question like the following: A Mexican rents a car in England, drives to Germany, and hits an Australian--what country...
  • Where Has All the Humor Gone?

    (originally published in WWNK 2/21/05) Back in the bad old days, we made moron jokes, Polack jokes, and a whole host of others that are frowned upon in our present-day, politically correct society. That such humor has disappeared from polite company is...
  • Nanomedicine Now

    (originally published in WWNK 2/14/05) In WWNK 6/14/2004 , we reported on the promising future of nanomedicine. While the advanced technologies scientists are feverishly working on seem nothing short of miraculous, their practical application is doubtlessly...
  • NGOs: The Hapless Helpers

    originally published in WWNK 11/22/04) It sounded like a heinous injustice. The evil World Bank was foisting a dam-building project on unwilling citizens in Uganda, causing environmental destruction and the forcible relocation of nearby villagers. What...
  • Does Your Pillow Take Your Breath Away?

    If you watch TV on a regular basis, you probably know the commercial that alerts you to the accumulation of "body soil" on your bedding. The advertisement--which tries to sell a laundry detergent--shows a man jumping into bed and sinking into...
  • Remote-Controlled Humans by Doug Casey

    Back in the late '90s, scientists at Tokyo University perfected a remote-control device that allowed them to manipulate cockroaches. The device, which was surgically implanted on the insect's back, sent impulses through electrodes that had replaced...
  • The Plight of Cory Maye

    Suppose for a moment that you're 21 again. It's late at night and you've fallen asleep in a chair in the living room of your duplex apartment. You have an 18-month-old daughter who's sleeping peacefully in her bedroom. You've never...

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