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  • Fed: Almost Half of US Households Have Under $400 Saved

    We begin today by looking at the recently released Federal Reserve study on the economic conditions of 50,000 randomly-selected US households. This annual survey attempts to capture a snapshot of the financial and economic well-being (or not well-being) of US households. Let me warn you upfront that some of the findings are really bad.

    Following that discussion, I will reprint a recent study by FORBES which concludes that Americans who make over $100,000 pay almost 80% of all federal income taxes. That’s right. According to IRS data, Americans earning over $100,000 paid 79.5% of federal income taxes for 2014. This proves that top income earners pay more in income taxes than those who earn less.

    Finally, I have two great opinion pieces in SPECIAL ARTICLES at the end that everyone should read, regardless of who you will be voting for in November.

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  • Retirement Saving Crisis is Worse Than We Thought

    Each year Wells Fargo & Company conducts a survey of middle-class Americans of various ages to see how they are faring with saving for retirement. The results of the 2014 survey were just made public late last month. I will summarize them for you below. Let me warn you in advance – they are not pretty!

    But first, let’s take a look at last Friday’s better than expected October unemployment report. The headline unemployment rate fell to 5.8%, the lowest level in almost six years. So far in 2014, new jobs are being added at the fastest pace since 1999. Best of all, the employment rate for young people ages 25-34 rose to the highest level since late 2008.

    To all of our brave men and women who have served in our Armed Forces, we thank you and wish you a Happy Veterans Day!

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  • US Savings Rate Falling Again – Here Comes "MyRA"

    Today we weave together several different topics that are all connected in one way or another. We begin with the US savings rate which is trending lower once again. From 1975 to 2007, the savings rate fell to an all-time low of 2.4%. While it jumped up briefly after the 2008 financial crisis, it is now moving lower yet again.

    In an effort to boost the US savings rate, especially for lower income groups, President Obama introduced a new type of starter retirement account for Americans of modest means that he called the MyRA, which stands for “My Retirement Account” and rhymes with IRA.

    While the new MyRA may be well intentioned, it is fraught with problems – most notably that it can only be invested in government securities that have yielded paltry returns over the last decade or longer. And when inflation rises, MyRAs are sure to be a big disappointment. I’ll tell you why as we go along today.

    Next, the recent Congressional Budget Office report, with its economic projections over the next 10 years, contained several troubling findings that the mainstream media and politicians in Washington deliberately didn’t tell you about. I’ll tell you why below.

    Finally, the president recently told a series of whoppers following the CBO’s latest report that claims Obamacare will cost 2.5 million jobs over the next decade. He lied, misrepresented and completely contradicted several key statements he has made in the past. Obama easily hit a new high in his presidency for deception.  You really need to read this!

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  • Teaching Your Kids to Save & Invest Wisely

    Italy was nice, but it's great to be back home. Because of my travel schedule, this week's E-Letter is a topic that we re-run periodically - how to teach your children to save and invest wisely.

    I consider it to be a duty and obligation of parents to teach their children about money, saving and investments. However, you'd be surprised to find that even many adult children of our clients have little or no financial knowledge. While it may be awkward to begin talking about saving and investing with your children when they are adults, it's not so bad if you begin sharing your knowledge with your children when they are young.

    This week's E-Letter will discuss ways to teach your children or grandchildren (or anyone) about saving and investing as well as ways to mentor your children financially even in their adult years. There's lots of good information in this issue, so I urge you to forward it to anyone you feel may benefit from it.

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