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  • America's National Debt Tops $13 Trillion

    With relatively little fanfare in the media, the US national debt cruised above $13 trillion last month. The federal budget deficit for fiscal 2010 is projected to reach a record $1.5 trillion by September 30, and will be above $1 trillion in fiscal 2011 as well. President Obama's own budget projections show that our national debt will swell by almost $10 trillion more over the next 10 years.

    This out-of-control spending has caused both the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) to formally call for the Obama administration to curb its budget deficits. In response, President Obama has created a 'Debt Commission' to study ways to reduce the deficits. Don't be surprised if this commission concludes that the only way to fix the problem is a 'Value-Added Tax' (VAT).

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  • The Mother of All Budget Deficits

    President Obama unveiled his fiscal year 2011 federal budget last week, and it is another whopper. If approved, he would spend a record $3.83 trillion and run a deficit of at least another $1.3 trillion. The actual deficit could be much higher because his assumptions about the economy are considerably too optimistic in my opinion and that of many economists. Obama's new budget projections now show that the budget deficit for FY2010, which ends on September 30, will be much higher than previously forecast - a whopping $1.6 trillion. This week, we will examine the implications of trillion dollar deficits as far as the eye can see.

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  • On the Economy & Obama's Trillions

    Most (but not all) of the economic reports over the last month or so have been positive, and more and more forecasters now believe that GDP growth will be slightly positive in the 3Q. Unfortunately, we don't get our first 3Q GDP estimate until the end of October. The latest GDP estimate for the 2Q was unchanged at -1.0%, which was better than expected. I will cover the latest encouraging (and not so encouraging) economic news just below.

    Next, on Friday, August 21, the Obama administration quietly announced that the White House Office of Management & Budget revised upward its long-term federal deficit projections to fall in line with those of the Congressional Budget Office. The White House finally admitted that its economic assumptions were too optimistic - to the tune of $2 trillion over the next 10 years. So now it's official - even President Obama admits he will more than double the national debt in the next 10 years, which will likely lead to another financial crisis.

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  • Second Stimulus - Good Money After Bad

    We will touch several bases in this week's E-Letter. First, we take a close look at the latest economic data which has a few 'green shoots' but remains mostly negative, and further supports my view that we will not be out of this recession for some time to come. Second, I share my thoughts on why a second major stimulus package is not a good idea, and my thoughts on what the government should do instead. And finally, I share with you the best article I've seen on why the official monthly government 'unemployment rate' report is so under-stated. It all should make for interesting reading.

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  • Obama On Course To Double National Debt

    Based on the Obama administration's own spending forecasts, the US national debt is projected to double over the next 10 years. Currently at over $11.4 trillion, the national debt is projected to balloon to at least $22.5 trillion over the next 10 years, according to the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office. The CBO now forecasts the fiscal 2009 budget deficit at a record $1.845 trillion alone, with another deficit of $1.4 trillion in fiscal 2010. If our national debt in fact doubles in the next 10 years (and it could more than double), this will be bad news for the US dollar and interest rates, which in turn is bad news for stocks. As you might expect, the liberal media is not talking about these new debt numbers, so I will lay it all out for you this week. Feel free to pass this week's E-Letter on to others - we need to get out the word!...