Blogs

  • The Burning Questions For 2015

    This week, for your Outside the Box reading, I bring you one of the more thought-provoking pieces I’ve read from Louis in some time. In Thoughts from the Frontline I have been looking at world problems we need to focus on as we enter 2015. Today, Louis also gives us a piece along these lines, called “The Burning Questions for 2015,” in which he thinks about a “Chinese Marshall Plan” (and what a stronger US dollar might do to China), Abenomics as a “sideshow,” US capital misallocation, and whether or not we should even care about Europe. I think you will find the piece well worth your time.

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    Posted to John Mauldin's Outside the Box by John Mauldin on 12-19-2014
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  • Oil, Employment, and Growth

    Texas has been home to 40% of all new jobs created since June 2009. In 2013, the city of Houston had more housing starts than all of California. Much, though not all, of that growth is due directly to oil. Estimates are that 35–40% of total capital expenditure growth is related to energy. But it’s no secret that not only will energy-related capital expenditures not grow next year, they are likely to drop significantly. The news is full of stories about companies slashing their production budgets. This means lower employment, with all of the knock-on effects.

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    Posted to Thoughts From The Frontline by John Mauldin on 12-17-2014
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  • Plunging Oil Prices Spark Fears of Global Recession

    Today, we touch on several bases. No doubt everyone reading this noticed that stocks tanked last week, and now seem to be moving in lockstep with oil prices. While consumers welcome cheaper gas and heating oil prices, there is a growing fear that the collapse in oil prices may be a harbinger of a global recession.

    Despite worries that the oil price plunge is pulling down stock prices, the latest Reuters/University of Michigan Consumer Sentiment Index soared to a near eight-year high this month. Expectations for a better job market helped power the Index from 88.8 in November to 93.8 this month, well above expectations.

    Finally, I am sad to report that our national debt topped $18 trillion on November 28 according to the Treasury Department. It was not widely reported by the mainstream media, of course. While our annual budget deficits have come down significantly from the first four years of the Obama administration, we are still on-track to hit a whopping $20+ trillion national debt by 2019.

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    Posted to Forecasts & Trends by Gary D. Halbert on 12-16-2014
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  • How the Rising Dollar Could Trigger the Next Global Financial Crisis

    We are concerned about the consequences of multi-speed economic growth around the world and the growing divergence between major central banks. In our opinion, if these trends persist, they likely mean (1) a major US dollar rally, (2) a rapid unwind of QE-induced capital flows to emerging markets, (3) a hard slide in fragile emerging-market and commodity-exporter currencies, and (4) financial shocks capable of ushering in a new global financial crisis.

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    Posted to John Mauldin's Outside the Box by John Mauldin on 12-11-2014
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  • How Crude Oil’s Plunge Has Decimated OPEC

    Since peaking at around $107 per barrel back in June, crude oil prices for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) grade have plunged all the way to near $60. The collapse over the last six months has been stunning. I know of no forecaster that saw a decline of...
  • Thursday. Central Bank Meeting Day.

    In This Issue.

    * Norges Bank cuts rates.

    * RBNZ leaves OCR unchanged .

    * Russian hikes rates 100 Basis Points!.

    * Retail Sales today.

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    Posted to Daily Pfennig by Chuck Butler on 12-11-2014
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  • Macroeconomics Finally Gets Interesting

    Since I began writing this letter some 15 years ago, I’ve always done an annual forecast letter, generally in the first week of January. That letter is typically the most-read issue of the year, and I spend more time thinking about it than any other letter. I typically take the last week of the year off from writing just to concentrate on my research, and I often begin to compile my reading material the first week in December, which the calendar tells us is now. Helping me this year will be my associate Worth Wray and a few members of the Mauldin Economics team, and of course my many friends and readers.

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    Posted to Thoughts From The Frontline by John Mauldin on 12-10-2014
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  • November Jobs Report Wasn’t So Great After All

    Today we'll take a close look at the November employment report last Friday, which was a positive surprise.  The 321,000 new jobs added last month was the highest reading since January 2012 and was substantially above the pre-report consensus of 230,000. The headline unemployment rate remained at 5.8%. The question is, will such job growth continue, or was this a one-month, seasonal anomaly?

    Yet not all of the news in the November jobs report was positive. While the headline new jobs number was 321,000, a deeper dive into the data reveals that there were only 4,000 more Americans working in November than in October (details to follow). Full-time jobs declined by 150,000, while lower-paying part-time positions increased by 77,000 – that’s not good.

    President Obama praised the jobs report and suggested that the economy is nearing full employment. The truth is, the economy is still far from full employment. The unemployment rate would have to fall to 5% or lower for that to happen, and it is not expected to do so anytime soon.

    And speaking of the president, rumors are swirling in Washington that Obama is seriously considering new sanctions against Israel, our strongest ally in the Middle East. The Obama administration is opposed to Israel’s decision to build new homes in East Jerusalem, and that this construction“undermines the peace process.” Now, apparently, they are considering sanctions against Israel. That is preposterous!

    Finally, our recent live webinar with Wellesley Investment Advisors is now available for viewing on our website. Wellesley invests exclusively in convertible bonds and is the only convertible manager we recommend. Whether you are knowledgeable about convertible bonds or not, I highly recommend that you watch this presentation.

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    Posted to Forecasts & Trends by Gary D. Halbert on 12-09-2014
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  • The World’s Dumbest Idea

    In today’s Outside the Box the redoubtable James Montier of GMO lifts his lance to prick the underbelly of the Mighty SVM. (That’s Shareholder Value Maximization, for you newbies.) “The world’s dumbest idea” (among many candidates in the world of finance), says James, citing none other than “Neutron Jack” Welch in support.

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    Posted to John Mauldin's Outside the Box by John Mauldin on 12-05-2014
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  • On The Economy, Oil Prices & Obama’s Temper Tantrum

    Today we'll touch on several bases, as I'm often known to do. We will start with the latest news on the economy, which is decidedly upbeat, with GDP coming in well above-trend for the last two quarters. The question is whether the latest two quarters of above-average growth are a sign of more good things to come, or are they just the catch-up results of the disappointing 1Q decline due to the severe winter weather?

    Even with the strong growth in the 2Q and 3Q, if we look back further, say to 2010, GDP growth over that period is still below trend at around 2.5% - which is unexceptional. So it remains to be seen if the economy is fully back on track.

    Some argue that the surge in the economy of late is largely the result of the huge decline in oil and gasoline prices. No doubt that has been a significant factor. Some analysts estimate that the drop in oil prices from above $100 a barrel to $67 is the equivalent of a $125 billion tax cut, which is a significant boost to the economy. And most forecasters believe that oil prices will remain low for some time to come, as I will discuss today.

    Finally, I can't help but comment on the deluge of unpopular actions taken by President Obama in just the last month. Unlike most recent presidents who suffered such a defeat in the mid-terms – including Reagan, Clinton and Bush(43) – and then compromised with the opposition, Obama is doubling-down on his unpopular policies. Even worse, he says he's not done yet and promised to veto any bill to build the Keystone XL pipeline.

    To me, this rash of controversial decisions amounts to a “temper tantrum” on the part of the president, in reaction to the drubbing that the Democrats suffered in the mid-term elections. I'll share my thoughts on why this is happening now as we go along today.

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    Posted to Forecasts & Trends by Gary D. Halbert on 12-02-2014
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  • Is Bitcoin the Future?

    Bitcoin is a topic of discussion almost everywhere I go. My introduction to Bitcoin came when I was speaking at a gold conference in Palm Springs and three bright-eyed, bushy-tailed college students approached me with a video camera and asked for my thoughts on Bitcoin. Noting my confusion, they began to evangelistically espouse the virtues of Bitcoin and tell me how it would save us from the evils of the Federal Reserve. I kept from rolling my eyes (you do want to encourage passion in the young) and mentioned a meeting that I had to go to – at that very moment as it turned out.

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    Posted to Thoughts From The Frontline by John Mauldin on 12-01-2014
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  • Investors That Do Not Understand The Power Of Seven Will Lose Money in 2015

    Investors and traders around the world continually search to find or increase their edge in the financial markets to boost profits. The next few months are going to be critical for investors because the number seven is now in play for the stock market...
  • Crude Oil Slides to Multi Year Lows and What to Expect

    Looking back to 2007 (seven years ago) we have seen the price of crude oil perform incredible price swings. No matter the time frame in which we observe price when an extreme price spike takes place due to news/event, statistics show that half if not...
    Posted to The Gold And Oil Guy by Chris Vermeulen on 11-28-2014
  • On the Verge of Chaos

    “Great powers and empires are, I would suggest, complex systems, made up of a very large number of interacting components that are asymmetrically organized, which means their construction more resembles a termite hill than an Egyptian pyramid. They operate somewhere between order and disorder – on “the edge of chaos,” in the phrase of the computer scientist Christopher Langton. Such systems can appear to operate quite stably for some time; they seem to be in equilibrium but are, in fact, constantly adapting. But there comes a moment when complex systems “go critical.” A very small trigger can set off a “phase transition” from a benign equilibrium to a crisis – a single grain of sand causes a whole pile to collapse, or a butterfly flaps its wings in the Amazon and brings about a hurricane in southeastern England.

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    Posted to Thoughts From The Frontline by John Mauldin on 11-25-2014
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  • Will Congress Fight Obama’s Immigration Power Grab?

    President Obama is expected to announce, in a prime-time speech tonight, his decision to halt deportation plans (read: amnesty) for apprx. five million immigrants who came into this country illegally. Despite the landslide midterm election results, which...
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